Like the rest of Australia, solar power system prices in Hobart have been on a downwards trajectory for several years now, making solar panels an option to consider for anyone living in Tasmania’s capital. This article is an overview of what you need to consider when when shopping for a solar system in Tasmania, including pricing, incentives and system sizing.

Benefits of solar power in Hobart: Generate your own electricity

Here is the most important thing you need to know about going solar in Hobart:

These days, having a solar panel system on your roof delivers energy bill savings in two ways:

  • Solar self-consumption – using the solar energy directly within your home (and thereby avoiding having to purchase it from your mains); and
  • Solar feed-in tariffs – credits that are applied to your energy bill for ‘excess’ solar energy that you send into the grid.

With grid electricity prices (the purchase price of electricity) at about 26 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh), Tasmanian households maximise their solar benefits through self-consumption. With a current feed-in rate of 9c/kWh, on the other hand, sending energy into the grid for bill credits is mainly a secondary benefit to having solar. Read the full article →

{ 5 comments }

Roger Cox 13 September, 2015 at 1:01 am

There is a mistake in the paragraph below. You probably mean … greater than you heating loads in the winter, instead of “greater than your cooling loads.”

Bear in mind, though that the assumption behind this formula is that your summertime cooling loads (refrigerator, AC, etc) are greater than your cooling loads. This is generally the case as most homes do not use electricity for heating (instead opting for gas, wood, or oil), but they do generally use electricity for cooling.

Solar Choice Staff 14 September, 2015 at 10:27 am

Thanks, Roger – we have fixed the typo. And your point that summer electrical cooling loads are usually lower than winter electrical heating loads in most homes is definitely correct. Each home should look at their own situation carefully before making a decision about going solar.

John Holloway 15 September, 2014 at 5:44 pm

Could you please advise what tilt angle a solar array should be installed at when the house is situated very close to Hobart?

Many thanks,

John Holloway

Solar Choice Staff 16 September, 2014 at 6:09 am

Hi John,

As a rule of thumb, grid-connected systems should have their solar panel array tilted so as to optimise for summer solar irradiation. The formula for this is latitude minus 10degrees. Since the latitude for Hobart is 42, the best tilt angle would be around 32degrees. (Read more: Solar panel tilt & orientation in Australia.)

Bear in mind, though that the assumption behind this formula is that your summertime cooling loads (refrigerator, AC, etc) are greater than your heating loads in winter. This is generally the case as most homes do not use electricity for heating (instead opting for gas, wood, or oil), but they do generally use electricity for cooling.

Hope this helps!

John Thirgood 6 April, 2013 at 11:55 pm

THE CURRENT FEED-IN TARIFF ARRANGEMENT
• Tasmanians who have solar power and are producing more than they use are currently receiving a 1 for 1 feed-in arrangement for feed-in. This mean that they are essentially able to “park” their excess power at Aurora and the save that for a time of year when they need it.
THE PROBLEM
• Treasury is analysing and reviewing the current system of solar grid feed-in rates in Tasmania and the talk and fear in the community that we may end up with a 6 or 8 cent feed-in tariff.
• Tasmanians who have installed solar power, have done so with the security of a one for one feed-in tariff. This made it a viable proposition for them.
• Without the feed-in tariff as we have it, the investment will be scuttled by any decision to reduce tariff to such a low level.
• The many solar businesses in Tasmania will be put at extreme risk of failing with a huge lost of job directly and indirectly in the industry.
• Local jobs and further expansion and employment opportunity is now under serious threat and the future is resting on the outcome of this government decision.
WHAT CAN WE DO ABOUT IT?
• We can combine our voices to demand that our feed-in tariff is retained is protected by legislation from our parliament.

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