ACT Solar Feed-in Tariff to remain unchanged at $0.457/kWh

ACT residents who install solar power systems for the 2011-2012 financial year can expect the same generous feed-in tariff rate for systems classified as ‘small’ (read: residential) that was offered the previous year: $0.457/kWh.

–UPDATE 24 August 2011: The ACT feed-in tariff scheme has concluded, but a 1:1 net feed-in tariff (where you are paid the retail electricity rate for electricity you feed into the grid) is still on offer for solar customers. For up-to-date info, please see our solar feed-in tariff rewards page.–

The Australian Capital Territory government has decided not to implement the recommendation of the Independent Competition and Regulatory Commission (ICRC), “a statutory body set up to regulate prices, access to infrastructure services and other matters in relation to regulated industries and to investigate competitive neutrality complaints and government-regulated activities.” The Commission’s suggested rate of $0.39/kWh was deemed by the government to be less conducive to the overall health and stability of the solar power industry than the current, higher rate, especially when taking into account a possible depreciation of the Australian dollar, which remains at a historical high.

Energy Minister Simon Corbell pointed to the Australian currency’s role in the apparent decreasing price of solar photovoltaic systems.  He further justified the decision to leave the rate untouched, saying, “There is also some doubt as to the final outcome of the Federal Government’s decision to establish a carbon price as well as changes to Federal Government solar rebate schemes. … These outcomes are not yet clear and it is prudent to not act prematurely.”

© 2010 Solar Choice Pty Ltd

Sources and Links:

ABC: “No change to solar tariff — ABC Canberra

ICRC: “Electricity Feed-in Agreements

Previous Solar Choice Blog Entries: ACT Feed-in Tariff Overview : State-by-state Feed-in Tariffs

James Martin II

Contributor at Solar Choice
James was Solar Choice's primary writer & researcher between 2010 and 2018.

He is now the communications manager for energy technology startup SwitchDin, but remains an occasional contributor to the Solar Choice blog.

James lives in Newcastle in a house with a weird solar system.
James Martin II