SA Feed-in Tariff: Rumours about sudden changes

SA solar customers must have received approval to connect to the grid by 30 September in order to take advantage of South Australia’s 44c/kWh feed-in tariff. (Get a free solar quote comparison of the installers who operate in your area of SA.) Click here for the most up-to-date info on the SA feed-in tariff.

Solar Choice has caught wind of some rumours floating around amongst customers that the SA feed-in tariff, currently 44c/kWh, could change this week (20 -25 June 2011) for those who haven’t applied for it. This is very unlikely to be the case, according to Solar Choice’s correspondence with the Clean Energy Council of Australia, owing mainly to the slow nature of the SA parliament’s bureaucratic processes.

The SA Opposition has requested scenario models for the future of the feed-in tariff in South Australia from the Essential Services Commission of South Australia, a state-government consumer-protection organisation. The scenarios examine a range of options which would, in different ways, affect people who have applied but who have yet to be connected, as well as those who haven’t even applied yet. Parliament may, in the end, pass a bill which matches any of the models, or one that is a compromise between two or more. Ordinarily, passing a bill would need to be considered by the lower house after being passed in the upper house. This process usually takes up to 2 weeks.

So in summary–the changes, whatever they are, are very unlikely to come into effect this week.

© 2011 Solar Choice Pty Ltd

Sources and Links:

Essential Services Commission of South Australia

Previous related Solar Choice Blog articles:

Proposed changes to South Australia Feed in Tariff

James Martin II

Contributor at Solar Choice
James was Solar Choice's primary writer & researcher between 2010 and 2018.

He is now the communications manager for energy technology startup SwitchDin, but remains an occasional contributor to the Solar Choice blog.

James lives in Newcastle in a house with a weird solar system.
James Martin II