New record for largest rooftop solar array in Australia

Previously we wrote about Australia’s two largest rooftop solar power arrays–The Adelaide Fairgrounds installation and the Sydney Theatre Company, 1MW and 340kW, respectively. This title has once again changed hands, however, and has gone to the University of Queensland’s St. Lucia Campus in Brisbane. This array, spread across eleven rooftops, has an installed capacity of 1.2MW and is composed of over 5,000 polycrystalline panels.

Much like the Adelaide Fairgrounds and STC installations, one of the reasons for the installation was to promote the cause of renewable energy and to spread the University of Queensland’s reputation as an innovative solar energy research centre; the installation will also serve as a training platform for the university.

œThe UQ solar power installation represents the leading edge of commercial and industrial scale solar energy in Australia. UQ will substantially reduce its carbon footprint and provide an excellent learning facility for future leaders of the renewable energy industry, said Ingenero CEO Steve McRae.

Written by James Martin

Solar Choice Analyst

© 2010 Solar Choice Pty Ltd

Sources and Links:

Previous Solar Choice blog about the now second and third largest rooftop installations can be read here.

Ingenero Pty Ltd: “UQ to host Australia’s largest solar PV flat panel array” (media release)

Photo of University of Queensland installation courtesy of Ingenero.

Although not responsible for the projects listed above, Solar Choice Commercial does manage the tender process for a wide diversity of large-scale solar power projects throughout Australia, including for mining companies, restaurant groups, shopping centres, and rural solar farms. For professional management and consultancy on your solar energy project, contact our Commercial Tenders Management team on 1300 78 72 73 for more information.

James Martin II

Contributor at Solar Choice
James was Solar Choice's primary writer & researcher between 2010 and 2018.

He is now the communications manager for energy technology startup SwitchDin, but remains an occasional contributor to the Solar Choice blog.

James lives in Newcastle in a house with a weird solar system.
James Martin II