The ACT aims for 90% clean energy by 2020

Following the recent re-election of the Labour Party in the Australian Capital Territory, residents and commercial business owners can look forward to some certainly in their solar energy investments thanks to the 90% renewable energy target that will now be implemented leading up to 2020. The Parliamentary Agreement was signed on 2 November by members of both the Labour Party and Green Party and represents an exciting period in renewably energy development in the ACT.

Leading up to the October election the Labour Government set out its Climate Change Action Plan for developing a sustainable future for the nations Capital. Aware of the current political focus on rising energy bills the plan will initially focus on helping home owners reduce their energy bills through energy efficience measure before installing large scale renewable energy from 2017. Although the future renewables mix places emphasis on two wind farms the two 20MW solar farms being built by the ACT Government along with independent projects means that solar power will continue to be a powerful player going into the future.

The top down investment from the ACT Government will also be supported by behaviour change from every day consumers. The Action Plan aims to have 30% of journeys around the Capital made by public transport and changes to the way waste is disposed, developing schemes to all but remove organic waste from landfill. This support the Governments secondary objective of reducing Carbon emissions to below 1990 levels by 2020.

More information on going solar in the ACT can be found in our blog. Alternatively you can complete our FREE Solar Quote Comparison and get an instant quote for up to 7 installers in your area or call us directly on 1300 78 72 73 and speak to one of our Solar Brokers.

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Rebecca Boyle

Rebecca is a sustainable development and marketing graduate, with a background in community engagement and research. She has a particular interest in sustainable resource use.
Rebecca Boyle